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The Sovereign Union of First Nations and Peoples in 'Australia' is asserting genuine pre-existing and continuing sovereignty over First Nations' territories, lands waters and natural resources. This is a liberation struggle educating, communicating, advocating and promoting the capacity-building of First Nation clans and Nations towards independence and governance, and involving reparation.. Facebook - Sovereign Union (https://www.facebook.com/SovereignUnion1/)
Updated: 18 hours 56 min ago

Queensland youth detention just as bad as Northern Territory: Aboriginal barrister

Tue, 2016/07/26 - 11:27pm
An Indigenous barrister in Queensland alleges the treatment of children in youth detention centres in his state is just as bad as that seen in the Northern Territory. He wants the Royal Commission broadened to include all Australian youth detention facilities. ABC News

Restarting a Nation - Euahlayi Peoples Republic

Tue, 2016/07/26 - 6:15am
In the east of the land that Europeans named Australia, a nation has been reborn. Its new head of state knows where his people lit their campfires, long ago. Now he has declared independence – and they're not the first to break away.

Lasting effects of trauma reaches across generations through DNA

Mon, 2016/07/18 - 9:57pm
CBC Radio - Canada Indigenous elders often say that memory is in the blood and bone, that our stories are passed not just verbally but through a kind of genetic memory. Well, it turns out that may not be far from the truth. Amy Bombay is Anishinaabe from Rainy River First Nation in Ontario. Amy Bombay and family Amy Bombay with her family. (courtesy Amy Bombay) She's an assistant professor of psychiatry at Dalhousie University in Halifax, and has been studying the impact of trauma and how it reverberates through generations. She was drawn to this field of study, specifically related to residential schools, because of its effect on her own family. "Both my grandparents on my father's side attended, and most of my aunts and uncles on that side as well," she explained. When she started her research 10 years ago, Bombay said she began by focusing on mental health outcomes, exploring why Indigenous Peoples in Canada and elsewhere suffer from higher levels of psychological distress. "What we found was that ... those who had a parent or grandparent who went to residential school seemed to be at increased risk for psychological distress, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and this is in both adults and youth," she said. Though our bodies are designed to deal with stress, Bombay said when the stress becomes chronic, our bodies are no longer able to keep up. That's when problems happen. Bombay said in addition to the psychological and social pathways, there is evidence epigenetic pathways are involved in the transmission of trauma. That evidence has been studied in the children of Holocaust survivors, in regard to changes in the expression of DNA, not changes to underlying DNA. "We now know that experiences and the environment can turn on or off genes, so the function of those genes is changed," Bombay explained. "In terms of how that is transmitted generationally, we know that if those changes happen to be in the germ line, so in the egg or the sperm, they have the potential to be transmitted across generations." Though Bombay said you cannot draw exact correlations between the children of Holocaust and Residential School survivors, there are clear similarities between the two groups. "We conducted our own research in relation to the residential school system and found a lot of the same issues like this conspiracy of silence around talking about this issue. And this research is consistent with populations that have undergone collective and historical trauma around the world," she said. "So not only in relation to the Holocaust, but we know these big historical and collective traumas are associated with a number of negative outcomes. Which are expected." Bombay has seen this research play a role in the process of reconciliation. And said taking the data out into communities and explaining it, has broken the silence. "A lot of people didn't know why their parents had so many problems, or they didn't know why their parents acted the way they do," she said. "Learning about these intergenerational effects really helped a lot of people heal and elicited forgiveness within families and communities."

Bob Hawke's ongoing calls for a Nuclear Waste Dump on Aboriginal Land

Mon, 2016/07/11 - 10:16pm
Since he was Prime Minister Bob Hawke has been calling for a Nuclear Watse dump on Aboriginal Land - It's a Win-Win situation This Audio from 'The Wire' 2014

Kennedy Hill, adjacent to multi million dollar resorts - ABC Report 2010 (Excerpt)

Sat, 2016/07/09 - 8:24pm
An excerpt from ABC 2010 report when people were moving into the Kennedy Hill area after being hunted off country by the WA government and mining companies.

Many current Aboriginal policies 'absurd', says leading academic

Thu, 2016/07/07 - 12:06pm
TRANSCRIPT MICHAEL BRISSENDEN: A number of leading Australian academics are expressing deep concern about the viability of many government Aboriginal community programmes. At a book launch in Sydney's inner west, researchers vented their frustrations at policy makers using words like "shameful" and "absurd" to describe many projects currently being implemented in outback communities. Our reporter, David Taylor, was there for AM. DAVID TAYLOR: Mark Moran has being looking at Indigenous policies over the past 20 years and whether or not they're working. He's just written a book highlighting how governments have fallen well short of what's needed to support Indigenous communities. MARK MORAN: You just arrive, you make it up and you leave after six months. And we wonder why we're not getting these long-term developmental gains. DAVID TAYLOR: He says, over a given fortnight, an Aboriginal youth could be swamped by as many as 10 so-called community reengagement programs. MARK MORAN: You end up with these quite ridiculous situations, where you'll have 50 disengaged youth and 10 programs that are specifically working to re-engage them. So in any one fortnight, an individual can have six, seven different programs hitting them at the same time. And the net effect of all these programs pushing and pulling people in different directions: it really is becoming absurd. DAVID TAYLOR: Mr Moran has support. Eva Cox is an adjunct professor at the University of Technology, Sydney and specialises in Indigenous affairs. EVA COX: I mean, we've just stuffed up. I think basically we've stuffed up at least over the last 20-odd years and I think it's time we actually went back and fixed it. DAVID TAYLOR: She argues many Aboriginal policies haven't improved since the late 1990s. EVA COX: Because I think we've grossly neglected anything to do with Indigenous policy in this last election. It's just disappeared. We've had bipartisan negligence from both the major parties. And it's something which I think is shameful and we need to do something about it. DAVID TAYLOR: Leanne Townsend is the CEO of the National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy. She grew up in the northern New South Wales community of Uralla and identifies as Anaiwan. She says policy needs to be led by community elders to be effective. LEANNE TOWNSEND: And the removal of politics to realise the genuine change driven by Aboriginal people themselves. DAVID TAYLOR: In a written statement, a spokesperson for the Indigenous Affairs Minister, Nigel Scullion, said that the Coalition Government's focus in Indigenous Affairs has been on getting children to school and adults to work and making communities safer. The statement went on to say that the Coalition's policies have seen progress made in these areas, but the Minister recognises a lot more work needs to be done. DAVID TAYLOR: Leanne Townsend again: LEANNE TOWNSEND: We have this approach and reference tonight, taken largely from the corporate sector of KPIs and measurements. And I agree that's absolutely what's required in performance. But who holds government to account equally with their failures? And we understand that as the mob who are experiencing those failures, but what is the broader Australia doing about that accountability? MICHAEL BRISSENDEN: Leanne Townsend from the National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy, ending David Taylor's report.

Bruce Pascoe on pre-colonial Aboriginal agriculture

Wed, 2016/07/06 - 8:13am
Bruce is a prolific writer and editor of fiction for adults and young people; and he also writes essays and history. His book Dark Emu presents a radically different picture of Australia's original inhabitants, and how they maintained their culture over millennia. From the journals and records of early explorers and surveyors, Bruce has accumulated astonishing descriptions of a pre-colonial Aboriginal life. Mitchell, Sturt and others describe scenes all around the country of Aboriginal people engineering sophisticated dwellings and irrigation systems. They also describe the cultivation of vast areas of land for yam fields; and the harvesting, storage and milling of grain crops. Bruce is of Tasmanian, Bunurong and Yuin heritage and he lives on country, deep in the Victorian bush. - - - - - - - - - We extracted flour from kangaroo grass seed two weeks ago and have been able to make a wonderful bread with a 60/40 blend of white flour/kangaroo grass flour and it was delicious. Further information Dark Emu: Black Seeds - Agriculture or Accident? is published by Magabala Books Dark Emu won Book of the Year, and the Indigenous Writing Prize jointly with Ellen van Neerven, at the 2016 NSW Premier's Literary Awards Buce's latest novel for Young Adults is Seahorse Sources referred to in Bruce's conversation include: The Biggest Estate on Earth by Bill Gammage (2011) and Australia and the origins of agriculture by Gerritson (2008) Original broadcast February 2016 Source ABC Local Conversations with Richard Fidler http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2016/07/05/4494632.htm

Prof Irene Watson a Tanganekald and Meintangk woman with Amy McQuire

Sat, 2016/07/02 - 1:12pm
Irene Watson an Tanganekald and Meintangk woman from the Coorong region of the south east of South Australia, and one of the first Aboriginal people to graduate with a law degree. She has a long history in examining the legacy of colonialism, and the enduring doctrine of terra nullius in this country. She joined Amy McQuire to discuss many issues but in this excerpt why we have to start revitalising our connection to country, because there is no future in the Western idea of 'progress'. The complete discussion can be found on 98.9 FM 'Lets Talk'. www.989fm.com.au/podcasts/lets-talk/prof-irene-watson

Descendant of first contact says Australia was invaded 'by gunfire'

Sat, 2016/06/25 - 7:59am
Rodney Kelly is the sixth generation descendant of the Gweagal aboriginal warrior, Cooman, who was shot by Captain Cook's landing party at Botany Bay in April 1770. Kelly says Australia was invaded 'by gunfire'. He says the shield belonging to Cooman still has white ochre on it from that day, and a musket hole from when his ancestor was fired upon. The shield has been preserved in the British Museum for more than 240 years. Now, Rodney Kelly is crowdfunding so he can travel to the UK to meet with the British Museum and continue his campaign for the shield's return to Australia. 'We feel [the shield] takes us back to a time before the British come here, it connects us back a long time ago. It's just significant, we have lost a lot of history, we've lost a lot of things,' says Kelly. 'For this shield to be connected to us is very significant and makes us very proud. We we just want it to come back home to Australia.' ABC Radio - RN Breakfast with Fran Kelly

Bilby protection festival a success say Aboriginal Rangers

Fri, 2016/06/24 - 10:15am
Rangers hosting this week's bilby festival in Australia's most remote community are pleased with the amount of knowledge that's been shared on protecting the native animal. Media player: "Space" to play, "M" to mute, "left" and "right" to seek. 00:00 00:00 AUDIO: Kiwirrkurra ranger Patrick Green says this week's bilby festival has been a success and he's pleased with the amount of knowledge that's been shared on protecting the native animal. (ABC Rural) The event in Kiwirrkurra, Pintupi country, 850 kilometres west of Alice Springs has attracted people from all over Australia's central deserts. Kiwirrkurra ranger Patrick Green has been hosting the event and said it was important to share knowledge about Bilby protection because the native animal was endangered and vulnerable.

Aboriginal Marathon runner will take 21 prisoners on a fun run - outside prison

Fri, 2016/06/24 - 7:02am
A new program at West Kimberley Regional Prison near Derby is using this philosophy to try to help the prisoners. Indigenous marathon runner, Adrian Dodson-Shaw talks to ABC Kimberley radio's Fiona Poole about how he will lead a 5km fun run with 21 prisoners. ABC WA

Descendant of first contact says Australia was invaded 'by gunfire'

Thu, 2016/06/23 - 11:37pm
Rodney Kelly is the sixth generation descendant of the Gweagal aboriginal warrior, Cooman, who was shot by Captain Cook's landing party at Botany Bay in April 1770. Kelly says Australia was invaded 'by gunfire'. He says the shield belonging to Cooman still has white ochre on it from that day, and a musket hole from when his ancestor was fired upon. The shield has been preserved in the British Museum for more than 240 years. Now, Rodney Kelly is crowdfunding so he can travel to the UK to meet with the British Museum and continue his campaign for the shield's return to Australia. 'We feel [the shield] takes us back to a time before the British come here, it connects us back a long time ago. It's just significant, we have lost a lot of history, we've lost a lot of things,' says Kelly. 'For this shield to be connected to us is very significant and makes us very proud. We we just want it to come back home to Australia.' ABC Radio - RN Breakfast with Fran Kelly

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Thu, 2016/06/23 - 9:14am
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Aboriginal Rangers and scientists meet to protect the endagered Bilby

Wed, 2016/06/22 - 11:10pm
Bilbies are desert-dwelling marsupial omnivores; they are members of the order Peramelemorphia. At the time of European colonisation of Australia, there were two species. The lesser bilby became extinct in the 1950s; the greater bilby survives but remains endangered.

What is prison for? - The purpose of Prisons

Mon, 2016/06/20 - 7:19am
John Cleary ABC RN with Prof Eileen Baldry, Dr Mindy Sotiri, Fr Joe Caddy and Ben Quilty Recorded on Sunday, May 22, 2016

The Two State dispute on WA people in Darwin's 'Long Grass'

Sun, 2016/06/19 - 12:11am
A dispute has broken out between the West Australian and Northern Territory Governments over the movement of Aboriginal people across northern Australia. The Territory's Chief Minister, Adam Giles, has written to WA calling on it to take back homeless Indigenous people living on the outskirts of Darwin. Across the border, his comments have not been welcomed. ABC Radio 'PM' Repoprt

Anawain New England Elder questions comments by Barnaby Joyce

Fri, 2016/06/10 - 4:03am
Steve Widders, an Anawain Elder has questioned comments by Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce that Aboriginal people and their issues have always been a part of his life. Speaking on CAAMA Radio during a quick visit to Central Australia the Deputy Prime Minister told listeners he is not oblivious to Aboriginal issues. Steve Widders has a different opinion ... adding that Aboriginal issues appear to be getting little coverage in the lead up to the Federal election. Interview with Pixie Jenkins from Caama Radio

Fitzroy Crossings Victor Hunter responds to the 4 Corners report into waste in communities

Wed, 2016/06/08 - 9:32pm
Victor Hunter is the Director of the Foundation for Indigenous Sustainable Housing and he works in the Fitzroy Valley. Victor Hunter spoke with Vanessa Mills after the 4 Corners report into the millions being wasted in remote communities. He says that there needs to be proper checks into those who work with Aboriginal people. From ABC 4 Corners (Ripped Off)

John Pilger: Silencing of America as it prepares for war

Tue, 2016/06/07 - 9:16pm
Today on Flashpoints: Internationally renown documentary Filmmaker, John Pilger, on the silencing of America as it prepares for war. And Bernie Sanders supporters waiting to hear him speak out side the Allan Baptist Church in East Oakland, talk about why they much prefer him to Trump and Clinton From Flashpoint News Magazine

Aboriginal Songlines multimedia art : Sydney Opera House at Bennelong Point

Thu, 2016/05/26 - 10:37pm
An excerpt from ABC RN 'Books and Arts' It's called Songlines, and it’s part of Vivid Sydney, the world’s largest festival of light, music and ideas. Songlines draws on Indigenous creation stories from across Australia and it features the work of six Indigenous artists. Michael speaks to one of those artists, Djon Mundine OAM.

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