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The Sovereign Union of First Nations and Peoples in 'Australia' is asserting genuine pre-existing and continuing sovereignty over First Nations' territories, lands waters and natural resources. This is a liberation struggle educating, communicating, advocating and promoting the capacity-building of First Nation clans and Nations towards independence and governance, and involving reparation.. Facebook - Sovereign Union (https://www.facebook.com/SovereignUnion1/)
Updated: 18 hours 14 min ago

Minister for Employment Welfare dependancy farce

Thu, 2016/05/05 - 12:33pm
Minister for Employment Michaelia Cash with Jon Faine on 774 ABC Melbourne

Bruce Pascoe on sophistaced Aboriginal agriculture

Thu, 2016/05/05 - 8:12am
Bruce Pascoe's work presents a radically different picture of Australia's original inhabitants, and how they maintained their culture over millennia. From the journals and records of early explorers and surveyors, Bruce has accumulated astonishing descriptions of a pre-colonial Aboriginal life. Mitchell, Sturt and others describe scenes all around the country of Aboriginal people engineering sophisticated dwellings and irrigation systems. They also describe the cultivation of vast areas of land for yam fields; and the harvesting, storage and milling of grain crops. Bruce is of Tasmanian, Bunurong and Yuin heritage and he lives on country, deep in the Victorian bush.

Bruce Pascoe at Daylesford, Victoria, 7 April 2016

Tue, 2016/05/03 - 8:52am
To hear the complete recording of Bruce Pascoe and David Holmgren refer to the past to augment the future - Daylesford Town Hall, April 7 2016. https://soundcloud.com/hrn-522934863/land-cultures-bruce-pascoe-david-holmgren

Aboriginal stock pastoral strike 1946

Tue, 2016/04/26 - 1:31pm
Brett Derchow spoke with ABCs Tangiora Hinaki about the conditions of his people working in the pastoral industry during the 1940s.

World's study: Location doesn't determine disadvantage

Thu, 2016/04/21 - 10:17pm
The world’s biggest study on the health and wellbeing of Indigenous people has found that living in a richer country doesn’t give Indigenous people an advantage. The study of more than 150 million Indigenous people in 23 countries was published in the Lancet today. It’s found that the gap in life expectancy of Indigenous people in Australia is on par with Indigenous people in Cameroon. The report's lead author says social inequity such as access to education and jobs needs to change to improve the health of Indigenous people around the world

Aboriginal people affected by Maralinga nuclear tests take peace sculpture to Japan

Mon, 2016/04/18 - 9:11am
Members of an Aboriginal community affected by the nuclear bomb tests at Maralinga in the 1950s are connecting with nuclear bomb survivors in Japan. A group of artists from Yalata in South Australia are flying to Nagasaki today to unveil a sculpture for its peace park - it will be the first Australian sculpture in the memorial. The exchange is also allowing the two groups to exchange stories and discuss their experiences. Natalie Whiting from ABC Radio 'AM' reported this story on Thursday, April 14 See Transcript: http://nationalunitygovernment.org/content/aboriginal-people-affected-maralinga-nuclear-tests-take-peace-sculpture-japan

Electorate of McMillan: Renamed due to his role in First Nations Massacres

Fri, 2016/04/01 - 7:07am
From ABC RN's 'The World Today' Transcript: - ELEANOR HALL: To Victoria now, where a Federal Liberal MP is proposing to change the name of his electorate because of its links to the massacres of Australia's Indigenous people. The Eastern Victorian seat of McMillan is named for the notorious explorer, Angus McMillan. There is little resistance to changing the name, but there is debate about what the seat should be called now, as Robert French reports. ROBERT FRENCH: Angus McMillan was a Scottish pioneer who played a leading role in the extermination of Aboriginal people in Eastern Victoria more than 150 years ago. Jeannie Haughton is a local playwright who studied McMillan's life. JEANNIE HAUGHTON: He was a murderer. He was one of the people involved in several of the massacres in Gippsland. ROBERT FRENCH: The Federal Member for McMillan, Russell Broadbent, believes it's time to remove that association. RUSSELL BROADBENT: We're doing something about practical reconciliation. It's offering a hand out to those in our community, those Indigenous people that are offended by the name. ROBERT FRENCH: He's written to the Electoral Commission, requesting the name be changed during a boundary redistribution after this year's federal election. RUSSELL BROADBENT: It would send a message that we actually care about these issues and if we are not responsible to our past, we don't understand our past, we can't get on with our future. ROBERT FRENCH: But Mr Broadbent wants it named after another famous white man. RUSSELL BROADBENT: I just think that Sir John Monash is such an icon. He actually provided the electricity that provided the wealth for manufacturing right across Victoria. He made Victoria great and he should be recognised. ROBERT FRENCH: That's being questioned by local historian Linda Barraclough, who says the local Indigenous community should be consulted. She says there are plenty of candidates within the Gunai Kurnai history. LINDA BARRACLOUGH: One of the names that should be considered is Bungaleena who is an Aboriginal tribal leader in Gippsland and he was captured as part of the hunt for the mythical white woman and died in custody. ROBERT FRENCH: Reconciliation Australia's chief executive Justin Mohamed says changing the name is a small but important step. JUSTIN MOHAMED: It's a great tribute that people from that region have identified this and they want change and to have a name that everyone can be proud of. ROBERT FRENCH: But he says it needs to be done in partnership with the traditional owners. JUSTIN MOHAMED: Many Aboriginal people from that region would have known this history and it would have been passed down through many generations. So for them even to kind of even to have into walk into an electoral booth and vote for that seat would cause some distress and pain. I think will be a sense of victory but also a sense that people feel yeah right, finally people have heard and understand and the truth is being told and the appropriate action has taken place. ROBERT FRENCH: Mr Mohamed says it's the first time he's heard of it happening in Australia and hopes it will lead to further change across the country. JUSTIN MOHAMED: Hopefully this can also be, you know, show some leadership across other parts of Australia where similar sorts of names or places have been headed up by people or named by people which have caused a lot of hurt and destruction to Aboriginal people. ELEANOR HALL: That's Reconciliation Australia's chief executive, Justin Mohamed, ending that report from Robert French. MORE TO ADD? ALERT US » PRINT THIS STORY » EMAIL A FRIEND » SHARE ON FACEBOOK » SHARE ON TWITTER » SHARE ON REDDIT» From the Archives 26/02/2007 Keating reflects on Rudd's election in '07 Play MP3 of Keating reflects on Rudd's election in '07 ( minutes) MORE Recent Programs PREVIOUS THURSDAY MP3 PREVIOUS WEDNESDAY MP3 PREVIOUS TUESDAY MP3 PREVIOUS MONDAY MP3 PREVIOUS FRIDAY MP3 Follow us... Follow us on FacebookFollow us on Twitter How a death can mould a health reform crusader Podcasts Subscribe to our Daily or Story podcast. ALL ABOUT PODCASTING Other News Websites AM PM THE WORLD TODAY CORRESPONDENTS REPORT http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2016/s4434576.htm

Electorate of McMillan: Renamed due to his role in First Nations Massacres

Fri, 2016/04/01 - 6:46am
From ABC RN's 'The World Today' ELEANOR HALL: To Victoria now, where a Federal Liberal MP is proposing to change the name of his electorate because of its links to the massacres of Australia's Indigenous people. The Eastern Victorian seat of McMillan is named for the notorious explorer, Angus McMillan. There is little resistance to changing the name, but there is debate about what the seat should be called now, as Robert French reports. ROBERT FRENCH: Angus McMillan was a Scottish pioneer who played a leading role in the extermination of Aboriginal people in Eastern Victoria more than 150 years ago. Jeannie Haughton is a local playwright who studied McMillan's life. JEANNIE HAUGHTON: He was a murderer. He was one of the people involved in several of the massacres in Gippsland. ROBERT FRENCH: The Federal Member for McMillan, Russell Broadbent, believes it's time to remove that association. RUSSELL BROADBENT: We're doing something about practical reconciliation. It's offering a hand out to those in our community, those Indigenous people that are offended by the name. ROBERT FRENCH: He's written to the Electoral Commission, requesting the name be changed during a boundary redistribution after this year's federal election. RUSSELL BROADBENT: It would send a message that we actually care about these issues and if we are not responsible to our past, we don't understand our past, we can't get on with our future. ROBERT FRENCH: But Mr Broadbent wants it named after another famous white man. RUSSELL BROADBENT: I just think that Sir John Monash is such an icon. He actually provided the electricity that provided the wealth for manufacturing right across Victoria. He made Victoria great and he should be recognised. ROBERT FRENCH: That's being questioned by local historian Linda Barraclough, who says the local Indigenous community should be consulted. She says there are plenty of candidates within the Gunai Kurnai history. LINDA BARRACLOUGH: One of the names that should be considered is Bungaleena who is an Aboriginal tribal leader in Gippsland and he was captured as part of the hunt for the mythical white woman and died in custody. ROBERT FRENCH: Reconciliation Australia's chief executive Justin Mohamed says changing the name is a small but important step. JUSTIN MOHAMED: It's a great tribute that people from that region have identified this and they want change and to have a name that everyone can be proud of. ROBERT FRENCH: But he says it needs to be done in partnership with the traditional owners. JUSTIN MOHAMED: Many Aboriginal people from that region would have known this history and it would have been passed down through many generations. So for them even to kind of even to have into walk into an electoral booth and vote for that seat would cause some distress and pain. I think will be a sense of victory but also a sense that people feel yeah right, finally people have heard and understand and the truth is being told and the appropriate action has taken place. ROBERT FRENCH: Mr Mohamed says it's the first time he's heard of it happening in Australia and hopes it will lead to further change across the country. JUSTIN MOHAMED: Hopefully this can also be, you know, show some leadership across other parts of Australia where similar sorts of names or places have been headed up by people or named by people which have caused a lot of hurt and destruction to Aboriginal people. ELEANOR HALL: That's Reconciliation Australia's chief executive, Justin Mohamed, ending that report from Robert French. MORE TO ADD? ALERT US » PRINT THIS STORY » EMAIL A FRIEND » SHARE ON FACEBOOK » SHARE ON TWITTER » SHARE ON REDDIT» From the Archives 26/02/2007 Keating reflects on Rudd's election in '07 Play MP3 of Keating reflects on Rudd's election in '07 ( minutes) MORE Recent Programs PREVIOUS THURSDAY MP3 PREVIOUS WEDNESDAY MP3 PREVIOUS TUESDAY MP3 PREVIOUS MONDAY MP3 PREVIOUS FRIDAY MP3 Follow us... Follow us on FacebookFollow us on Twitter How a death can mould a health reform crusader Podcasts Subscribe to our Daily or Story podcast. ALL ABOUT PODCASTING Other News Websites AM PM THE WORLD TODAY CORRESPONDENTS REPORT Transcript: - http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2016/s4434576.htm

Australian-first degree training Indigenous students to treat Indigenous mental health

Wed, 2016/03/23 - 9:52am
A new university degree that will allow Indigenous students to train to become Indigenous mental health practitioners has been widely praised by health and suicide prevention experts. It's hoped the course from Curtin University in Western Australia will be able to specifically address the growing rate of suicide within Indigenous communities. ABC RN 'The World Today' 4min 12sec

Kutcha Edwards with his 5 most creative inspirations

Wed, 2016/03/16 - 9:21am
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First Nations people as Harvest Workers run through

Sun, 2016/03/13 - 9:09am
Warringari Aboriginal Corporation CEO Desmond Hill said indigenous people were willing to work on farms but jobs had to be ongoing and well paid. "People are interested and are willing to look at working on farms … but it has to be 12 months of the year, not just seasonal," he said." The seasonality of harvest work was also flagged by Miriuwung Gajerrong Corporation CEO Neil Fong. "If they leave State housing and go into transitional housing then the season stops, they're then having to be forced to look for housing again," Mr Fong said. "So there are other social issues rather than just saying that jobs are available for short term or select periods of time."

Dying to Please You: Indigenous Suicide in Contemporary Canada

Sat, 2016/03/12 - 9:36pm
Ronald D Chrisjohn BSc (Central Michigan), MA, PhD (Western Ontario) Since at least 1977 there has been unquestionable proof that, depending on age, region, and other demographic factors, indigenous peoples in Canada have suicide rates anywhere between three and ten times the rates for non-indigenous Canadians. As a consequence, there has been since that time at least a moderate interest in mainstream Canada, both bureaucratically and academically, not only to explain this difference but to supply interventions into Native centers that will ameliorate this disparity. It is our contention that the existing work ostensibly aimed at resolving the "problem of Native suicide" has been less than useless, in that, not only does it promote a factually and scientifically specious understanding of the issues, it is a continuation and extension of the assault responsible in the first place. Our charge is grounded in the principles and origins of modern suicidology itself, while the traction that oppressive, victim-blaming explanations and interventions have received in even supposed radical-liberal literature is traced to the forces currently destroying everyone's... not just Indian's... worlds. Audio Source; http://fromthemargins.h-a-z.org/podcast/?p=episode&name=2014-06-27_dying_to_please_you_full.mp3 Roland Chrisjohn & Shaunessy McKay are the co-authors of a forthcoming book of the same title as this presentation: Dying to Please You: Indigenous Suicide in Contemporary Canada

Lionel Rose v Fighting Harada - 27 Feb 1968 Tokyo, Japan.

Sun, 2016/02/28 - 3:02am
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Indigenous academic Bronwyn Carson explores complexities of being Aboriginal and the politics of identity

Sat, 2016/02/27 - 3:26pm
Bronwyn Carlson's parents frequently accused each other of being "touched by the tar brush", which underpinned her struggle with her Aboriginal identity as a child. Her experience growing up with the understanding that she and her siblings "weren't white, but not Aboriginal either" inspired her recently published PhD, in which she explores the complexities of being an Aboriginal Australian. "I see people from uni who say, 'I'm Aboriginal but I know I don't look it'," Ms Carlson, Associate Professor of Indigenous Studies at the University of Wollongong, said. "I still hear comments like, 'I'm one-eighth, I'm one-quarter, half caste', and all these colonial terms, so those kind of things haven't gone away. "Aboriginal people have a lot to face from non-Aboriginal Australia, let alone from our own communities." Ms Carlson said Aboriginality was still a contested and complicated issue that had been fiercely politicised, with Aboriginal people still facing issues about "who gets to count" as Aboriginal. More: ABC News: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-23/indigenous-academic-explores-the-politics-of-being-aboriginal/7192318

Aunty Murial Walker - Full interview

Fri, 2016/02/26 - 7:39am
In 1990, Sixteen-year-old Colleen Walker-Craig kissed her mother goodbye before heading off to a friends party. That was the last time Aunty Murial Walker-Craig saw her daughter. For 24 years, Aunty Murial Walker has been waiting for her daughter to come home. Colleen is one of three children from the Bowraville Aboriginal Community who suddenly disappeared, never to be seen again. The other two children, Evelyn Greenup and Clinton Speedy-Duroux were found murdered. Colleen Walker disappeared on 13 September, 1990 and her weighted down clothing was later found in the Nambucca River. Although her body has never been found, she is presumed dead..

Aboriginal fishing: When culture becomes criminal

Thu, 2016/02/25 - 8:50am
'Why should we go and apply for a permit when fisheries know that we've got a right to go out and get a feed,' Wally Stewart says. 'That's what we are saying—we don’t need to go and get a permit. As far as I'm concerned they are still trying to put a regulation on us, and that is what has destroyed our culture, all these regulations. If they pull me up I’m just going to say I’m exempt from the Fisheries Act and the Marine Park Act as a traditional owner.' Read More: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/backgroundbriefing/aboriginal-fishers-report-harrassment-fishing-traditional-food/7180326

Australia has a fundamental responsibility to teach its children the true history of their country!

Tue, 2016/02/23 - 10:16am
Glen Yearwood (Storyteller) is a former London based communication expert who is traveling the globe to listen to the voice of the First Nations Peoples. Currently living in Alice Springs, Storyteller says has never seen or sensed the seething that he has experienced since arriving in Australia last year.. and that he believes there is a massive cavity in the relationship between white and black Australians. He told CAAMA that as a nation, Australia has a fundamental responsibility to teach children in schools the real history of their country.

Two Black Holes Colliding

Sat, 2016/02/13 - 10:13am
These chirps are gravitational waves converted to audible sounds. The faint thump matches the gravitational waves’ frequencies. The louder chirp is a higher frequency better suited to human ears. LIGO

First Nations Women Double imprisonment Rate

Sat, 2016/02/13 - 3:34am
Doubling of female imprisonment rate in Australia almost entirely due to Aboriginal women being locked up More here http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2014/s4066806.htm

Cherbourg's Female War Heroes

Thu, 2016/02/11 - 1:20pm
There has never been any recognition for the role that Aboriginal women played during war times. Many First Nations women joined the army, but those women who were left behind, had to take on traditionally male work. Gunggari woman, Dr Ruth Hegarty, Aboriginal author, is a recipient of the Queensland Great award for her contribution to building Queensland, grew up in the dormitory in Cherbourg Aboriginal Settlement, also known as Barambah. Aunty Ruth is 86 years old, and she remembers the role women from Cherbourg played during the second World War, and the role her mother, Ruby Duncan took on during war. Aunty Ruth talks with her granddaughter, Living Black producer, Minelle Creed about those times during war, and roles women played, and how the returned men were treated when the war ended.

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