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Assimilation & Oppression

Archbishop Tutu’s Prayer for the Rights of Aboriginal Peoples

Tutu

On World Peace Day 2014, I pray for the rights of the Aboriginal Peoples of Australia to determine their own destiny.

It is a severe indictment on Australia that many of its indigenous people still feel that their culture and dignity are being eroded, and that they continue to be treated as second class citizens – 42 years after the country signed the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. [node:read-more:link]

First Nations jazz singer finds stolen family in North West WA

Lois Olney was always told her mother had put her up for adoption, but a note scrawled on a pie wrapper and passed to her while singing on stage gave the first inkling she was stolen as a baby. Lois discovered her extended family in Roebourne Western Australia.

Lois had been adopted by the Olney family, with her adoptive father being Howard Olney who went on to become a state Labor politician, and then a Justice of the Supreme Court. [node:read-more:link]

Language diversity threatened in areas with high economic growth, study

When languages die, especially indigenous ones, a large part of culture and history disappears along with it

High rates of economic growth are a driving factor behind global language extinction, with one-quarter of all native tongues classified as "threatened," a new report has said.

Out of around 6,000 languages around the globe, 1,705 fit the criteria for "threatened" status. [node:read-more:link]

First Nations Women’s Ceremonial Walk for Freedom

We have seen enough of the poverty in our communities when the rest of Australia are growing rich on the proceeds of genocide through the loss of our homelands through real estate and mining.

We have seen enough of the self-medicating blocking out from our trauma and grief and the dysfunction this brings. We need our own healing camps and safe places for the community to come to in times of despair. [node:read-more:link]

Doubling the female imprisonment rate due to First Nations women being locked up

So many of the First Nations women in prison have been physically abused and/or have substance-abuse problems. One of the reasons these women make up such a disproportionate part of the prison population is that magistrates are required to follow sentencing guidelines; someone who has been arrested a certain number of times for, say, being drunk in public is required by such rules to spend time behind bars. Beyond that, Professor Baldry argues, some magistrates take an inappropriately paternalistic view that time in prison will be beneficial in blocking a woman's access to substances. [node:read-more:link]

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