Constitutional Reform

Constitutional recognition, Treaty and Sovereign Rights

Rejecting Constitution Recognition - Reconciliation begins with the truth of history

When this country is built on truth it will lay a solid foundation for the nation to come to maturity and accept the past, deal with it, and then find it within their hearts to pay respects to the First Nation people as equals and not an imitation of the 1901 model of the master and slave relationship.

Kerry Blackman, First Nations Justice Leader, writes about the Constitution Recognition farce. Read more about Rejecting Constitution Recognition - Reconciliation begins with the truth of history

Fred Chaney's absolute deceit – learn from the past and beware of "Recognise"

Fred Chaney made a career out of undermining First Nations' struggle for self-determination and he still promotes assimilation by leading our young people under the banner of 'Recognise'.

"In 1979, Fred Chaney committed a major illegal, immoral and unethical act against the Aboriginal Peoples of Aurukun, Mornington Island and Doomadgee when he, as the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs, commenced a legal challenge to the Queensland Government's proposal to establish the Deeds of Grants in Trust (DoGiT's) for these communities. Read more about Fred Chaney's absolute deceit – learn from the past and beware of "Recognise"

Constitutional recognition will do nothing for First Nations people

None of the recognition proposals confer any right on Aborigines to sue, nor do they impose any obligation on government to act, writes First Nations Activist, Michael Mansell.

"New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria and South Australia have already recognised indigenous people in their state constitutions and the Federal Parliament passed the Act of Recognition in 2013. Not a single benefit to anyone has flowed from those measures, writes Michael Mansell, a Lawyer and First Nations Activist from Tasmania." Read more about Constitutional recognition will do nothing for First Nations people

The 'Great Silence' of Australian media fails the First Nations people

First Nations people were expressly excluded from voting in federal elections until 1962, they did not have full citizenship rights and were not counted in censuses until 1967 and were classed as "flora and fauna". Conversely, between 1949 and 1973 British citizens could enter Australia without a visa, access welfare and had the right to vote. British subjects on the electoral roll before a change in legislation in 1984 still have the right to vote without being a citizen.

Read more about The 'Great Silence' of Australian media fails the First Nations people>

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