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Videos - Homelands explained

Homelands are communities established by Aboriginal people so that they can maintain their connection with their traditional, ancestral land. These communities have lower levels of social problems and significantly better health outcomes for Aboriginal people -- as well as a strengthened connection to culture, language and spirituality.

Why First Nations people need autonomy over their food supply

Going without food, or going without nutritious food, has heavy consequences for Indigenous people, as we learnt on a recent research trip to the West Kimberley. Indigenous Australians are already twice as likely to have a disability or chronic illness as non-Indigenous Australians; poor nutrition compounds these problems, leading to further illness and secondary impairments.Aboriginal people consistently reported alleviating food insecurity by going crabbing or fishing on traditional lands. Though this accounted for a small portion of total dietary intake. [node:read-more:link]

Stop the Forced Closure of Aboriginal Communities - Canberra Rally 1 May 2015

Stop the Forced Closure of Aboriginal Communities - Canberra Rally 1 May 2015
Welcome and Smoking with BILLY T Speaker Nungala LeeAnne Lacey Speaker Les Coe Speaker Alice Haines Speaker Roxley Foley
BillyT (Welcome), Nungala LeeAnne Lacey, Les Coe, Alice Haines and Roxley Foley - 19 March Vids

You must recognise that we are in a process of taking back our power to care for our own communities: Bella Bropho, Matargarup

"We have never been given the opportunity to live in our own ways ... since occupation of our lands in 1829, we have been forced, by successive policies, to be a reactive people. Now we are trying to change to be proactive, but we need time to do that in our own way. We are in the process of re-piecing together our community with our own value system, starting here at Heirisson Island," said Bella Bropho at the Matagarup Refugee Camp on Heirisson Island, Perth, Western Australia. [node:read-more:link]

Fighting domestic violence shouldn't mean revoking Aboriginal rights

Rosie Batty was right to criticise the federal government's allocation of a mere $16 million over three years to family violence in last week's budget. By comparison, more than a billion dollars was set aside for national security measures, an issue that is arguably costing fewer Australian lives at the present time. But when it comes to introducing oppressive legislation on the basis of race, state and federal governments suddenly seem to become incredibly concerned about violence against women - Celeste Liddle writes [node:read-more:link]

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