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Before Invasion

Carved trees of First Nations Peoples from Western New South Wales

CULTURAL WARNING - Gamilaroi and Wiradjuri women should note that the Lore prohibits you to view the images on this page. CLICK ANYWHERE HERE TO LEAVE IMMEDIATELY

For thousands of years Aboriginal groups in central NSW marked important ceremonial sites by carving beautiful, ornate designs on the trunks of trees. The carvings, comprising symbolic motifs, intricate swirls, circles and zigzags, were intended to be long-lasting but, instead, only a handful of the trees on which they were carved are still alive today. This page includes many images of carved trees, a pdf booklet and Powerpoint links with more images and information to download. [node:read-more:link]

Australian history curriculum - extension shelved but history choked

A federal government Ministers meeting passed a resolution supporting the four broad themes for change outlined in the federal government's initial response, which are reducing the overcrowding in the curriculum, promoting a parent-friendly version of the curriculum, improving accessibility for students with disabilities, and rebalancing the curriculum with the removal of the 'overarching themes' of Australian First Nations, Asia and sustainability issues embedded in curriculum subjects. [node:read-more:link]

How the First Nations people from the great southern continent saw the Stars

Aboriginal Astronomy

'Australian' First Nations people are the longest living continuous culture on earth, but modern researchers have just started to look at the wisdom that comes with the many thousand years of residency, and that's especially true of astronomy. They tracked and predicted interstellar movements in highly sophisticated ways, looking up at the night with eyes intriguingly different to our own. To hear some examples of things that they could teach us, I met with Swinburne University's Dr. Alan Duffy, who specializes in Australian First Nations astronomy. [node:read-more:link]

Sound files of the Frontier Wars - The First Nations fight back

In his new book, The Story of Australia's People, Geoffrey Blainey writes that one of the reasons aboriginal tribes didn’t effectively resist European settlement was that they were militarily weak. Indigenous tribes often fought with each other rather than launch coordinated attacks against settlers. An alternative view comes from expert in indigenous history, Dr Ray Kerkhove, who has done new research on indigenous warfare in Queensland in the 19th century. [node:read-more:link]

Pigments and palettes from the past – science of First Nations peoples art

Indigenous Art

The practices of First Nations people, honed over thousands of years, weave science with storytelling. In this Indigenous science series, we look at different aspects of their life and uncover the knowledge behind them. Here we examine the chemistry and techniques behind perhaps the most iconic element of Indigenous life: rock art. - An article by Andrew Thorn, Lecturer in Stone Conservation, from the International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property [node:read-more:link]

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