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Carved trees of First Nations Peoples from Western New South Wales

CULTURAL WARNING - Gamilaroi and Wiradjuri women should note that the Lore prohibits you to view the images on this page. CLICK ANYWHERE HERE TO LEAVE IMMEDIATELY

For thousands of years Aboriginal groups in central NSW marked important ceremonial sites by carving beautiful, ornate designs on the trunks of trees. The carvings, comprising symbolic motifs, intricate swirls, circles and zigzags, were intended to be long-lasting but, instead, only a handful of the trees on which they were carved are still alive today. This page includes many images of carved trees, a pdf booklet and Powerpoint links with more images and information to download. [node:read-more:link]

Slump in recommended First Nations sites receiving heritage listing in WA

Burrup Rock Art
Burrup Rock Art

A steep drop in Aboriginal sites being added to WA's heritage register is leading to "a vast sea of ignorance" that will thwart heritage protection, according to Carmen Lawrence, the chair of the Australian Heritage Council.
After changing the heritage laws to favour mining companies, Aboriginal Affairs Minister said some places "presented as worthy of protection" were "of little or no interest" to Aborigines and that only "the industry of heritage professionals" appeared to value those sites. [node:read-more:link]

Pigments and palettes from the past – science of First Nations peoples art

Indigenous Art

The practices of First Nations people, honed over thousands of years, weave science with storytelling. In this Indigenous science series, we look at different aspects of their life and uncover the knowledge behind them. Here we examine the chemistry and techniques behind perhaps the most iconic element of Indigenous life: rock art. - An article by Andrew Thorn, Lecturer in Stone Conservation, from the International Centre for the Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property [node:read-more:link]

Barnett Strips Dreaming of Heritage Status

WA Premier, Colin Barnett

In the past two years about 1500 sites have changed from being "registered" to "stored data", meaning they no longer warrant heritage protection. stated Academic, Professor Joe Dortch.

Most of those sites are in mining leaseholds belonging to Gina Rinehart and Andrew Forrest.Anthropologists are aghast at the interpretation, saying it's further evidence the Barnett government is taking Aboriginal heritage back 40 years. [node:read-more:link]

The man who calls himself by an Aboriginal name appears to have no interest in Aboriginality

The article 'Jobs and education are the lifters' by: Nyunggai Warren Mundine, The Australian 3 December 2014 with Comments by Maurene Brannan

... as if it meant nothing, which it apparently doesn't to Warren - 'cultural authority' does not come easy, it takes a lifetime of dedication and education in the highest, most evolved culture on Earth. [node:read-more:link]

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