Before Invasion

Evidence that 'Australian' First Nations peoples were the first Americans? Tribes in the Amazon found to be the most closely related

Our of Australia

A new genetic study is threatening to transform theories about who the original Native Americans were after finding certain tribes in the Amazon are related to Aborigines in Australia. Researchers believe these stories could constitute some of the oldest accurate oral histories in the world, passing through some 300 generations. Traditional stories passed down through generations by Australian Aborigines may be among the oldest accurate oral histories in the world. 'About 2 per cent of the ancestry of Amazonians today comes from this Australasian lineage that's not present in the same way elsewhere in the Americas.' Read more about Evidence that 'Australian' First Nations peoples were the first Americans? Tribes in the Amazon found to be the most closely related

Scientists say dingoes may save wildlife from extinction

Dingoes

Researchers are calling for the dog fence to be moved as an experiment that looks at ways to protect threatened native species and increase biodiversity. University of Sydney researcher Dr Thomas Newsome said the apex predator could play an important part in managing feral pests who prey on wildlife. "Our study is really tailored to helping to resolve the ongoing debate about whether the dingo can provide positive benefits to ecosystems that have suffered overgrazing of kangaroos and emus, as well as predation by introduced species such as feral cats and red foxes." Read more about Scientists say dingoes may save wildlife from extinction

Giant Lake Mungo was 20 per cent bigger than we thought, say researchers

Lake Mungo

Researchers established that Lake Mungo's high water mark was five metres higher than previously realised, and results of an international study has revealed that the iconic lake situated 90 kilometres north-east of Mildura, was actually a mega-lake, almost 20 per cent bigger than thought before. "Traces of people's activities are actually embedded in sediment, so that tells us that people were relying on watercraft to get around to exploit what was on the island in terms of animals to hunt," said La Trobe University archaeologist Nicola Stern. Read more about Giant Lake Mungo was 20 per cent bigger than we thought, say researchers

After 70 years, Aboriginal sacred site Kurlpurlunu found in Central Australia

An Aboriginal elder in Central Australia has shed tears of joy upon the rediscovery of a sacred site lost for the past 70 years. Previous attempts to find the Tanami Desert site, known as Kurlpurlunu, had proved fruitless until Warlpiri elders, George Jungarrayi Ryder and Molly Nappururla Tasman flew over the area in a helicopter last week. The elderly pair had visited the site as children and recognised some of the features, including a distinctive tree and a rock. The site's identity was confirmed by 82-year-old Jerry Jangala. Read more about After 70 years, Aboriginal sacred site Kurlpurlunu found in Central Australia

Kitty Wallaby: Linked between the Dreamtime and the grim world of 1800's

Kitty Wallaby's life was linked with the Dreamtime, and her people, the Gunditjmara in Western Victoria, built sprawling villages of stone houses and an aquaculture system that pre-dated Egypt's pyramids and Stonehenge. When Kitty told the invading pastoralists that is was her country, they were not interested in listening or understanding. Read more about Kitty Wallaby: Linked between the Dreamtime and the grim world of 1800's

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