Massacres & Trophies

War Memorial should recognise the Frontier Wars: Researcher

A researcher, who presented alarming numbers of the deaths in Queenslands Frontier Wars between 1788 and 1930 to the Australian Historical Association, said the estimated figure of 65,180 was "conservative" and could be as high as 115,000. A co-author of the report, historian Professor Raymond Evans, said the calculations were based on official records, witnesses' reports and the number of patrols undertaken by the colonial Queensland government's Native Police. - Pictured: Historian Professor Raymond Evans [node:read-more:link]

Gallipoli to Coniston - Remembering Frontiers - Seminar and Art Exhibition - Sydney

Two days of looking at the subject of war and who fought in those wars, and including the why. Very importantly several sessions will be dedicated to the frontier wars in the 'unsettling' of the invasion of the traditional nations of this country, Australia. - Thursday 28th and Friday 29th August 2014, Level 3, Mary Ann House,
645 Harris Street, University Technology Sydney
Image: A still from the documentary 'Coniston' [node:read-more:link]

Why the number of deaths in the Frontier Wars do matter

Some researchers have said that there was 10 First Nations people death for each European killed in the process of the British Invasion. However research is now telling us that is was probably 40 to 1.

There are stories of massacres everywhere in the archives of the major cultural institutions of Australia and Great Britain. They are in the diaries, letters, journals and memoirs of colonial and postcolonial officials, troops, police, farmers, frontiersmen and women. [node:read-more:link]

Undeclared "Wars" defined by Michael Anderson

The bone collectors: a brutal chapter in Australia's past

The remains of hundreds of First Nations people, dug up from sacred ground and once displayed in museums all over the world, are now stored in a Canberra warehouse. When will they be given an appropriate resting place? Some were passed off as victims of frontier violence between tribesmen – but mostly were defending traditional lands on the pastoral frontier – and colonial troops, paramilitary police forces, settler militia and raiding parties. Their bodies were cut up for parts that became sought-after antiquities across Australia and in cultural, medical and educational institutions globally. [node:read-more:link]

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